Brooklyn Winter Flea + Holiday Market

A weekly winter flea market featuring 50 vendors of vintage, antique, handmade, and food, within Industry City's premises, and a few block away from South Brooklyn Marine Terminal.

Founded in April 2008, Brooklyn Flea has grown into one of New York City’s top attractions, operating flea markets every weekend of the year that feature hundreds of top vendors of furniture, vintage clothing, collectibles and antiques, as well as a tightly curated selection of jewelry, art, and crafts by local artisans and designers, plus delicious fresh food. The New York Times called the Flea “One of the great urban experiences in New York”, and is regularly ranked by many magazines as one of the best markets in the U.S.

Until 2013, Brooklyn Flea was located inside a historic landmark known as One Hanson (the former Brooklyn bank built in the 1920s) showcasing limestone and marble interiors, with intricate mosaics. Nowadays, Brooklyn Flea holds 3 distinct markets over 8 locations around the city.

Starting the third weekend in November through March, the markets take place indoors, in Industry City. The Brooklyn Winter Flea + Holiday Market features around 50 vendors selling vintage, antique, handmade, and food, in a modern setting. The market is open every week in winter, rain or shine, and is dog-friendly. From April through November, the Brooklyn Flea moves outdoors to DUMBO.

The Flea also operates Smorgasburg, a giant all-food market that launched in May 2011 and happens Saturdays in Williamsburg and Sundays at Prospect Park’s Breeze Hill. Smorgasburg showcases the best of Brooklyn’s artisanal food scene, with 100 local and regional vendors in a beautiful outdoor setting.

If you don’t walk away with the perfect art deco vanity, you will leave with a full stomach. Food is a major focal point of the Brooklyn Flea, and you’ll find one of the best smattering of tacos, cupcakes, lobster rolls, cannoli and Asian-inspired hot dogs in the country.

Antiquing Tip Of The Day

When you’re looking for something specific, don’t be too shy to ask for directions. Merchants often know each other, or at the very least know about the other merchants, and can tell you which way to explore far better than a map can.

— Amanda Sims, writer at food52.com
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