Portland Flea-For-All

Featuring three stories full of second hand goods with a great deal of antique and collectable items thrown into the mix, Flea-For-All is definitely a hard complex to leave empty handed.

For those that like to head into one building to fulfill all shopping needs, whatever the weather, the Portland Flea-For-All is absolutely the place to go. With three stories full of second hand goods with a great deal of antique and collectable items thrown into the mix, Portland Flea-For-All is definitely a hard complex to leave empty handed.

Portland Flea-For-All is not the best place to go with a very specific item in mind that is desired. Not many stalls or vendors are highly specialized or trading in a narrow range of collectable goods. However, vendors are incredibly friendly, and it is easy to spend as much time chatting as shopping in this mega store. In fact, the secrete recipe to having fun when visiting Portland Flea-For-All, is to show up with an open mind, some cash in the wallet and a few hours to browse around and search for anything that catches the eye.

With this attitude, it is certainly easy to spend out at Portland Flea-For-All. On an average day, the flea market’s booths are filled with old posters, antique chairs, military paraphernalia, vintage wall maps, furniture (much of which has been up-cycled), jewelry, clothing, photographs, and vintage purses. No wonder why it is easy to get lost in nostalgia while wandering through the floors of this store.

Prices at Portland Flea-For-All tend to be a little on the high side, especially compared to other flea markets in and around the area, though for any and all items bargaining is most welcome. Therefore, it is often possible to negotiate down to reasonable prices and the occasional bargain, so shoppers need to be willing to put the effort in!

At flea markets, the bartering can often be what makes the shopping experience all the more worth it, and it is clear that everyone is ready for a good time at the Portland Flea-For-All. It is most certainly worth a visit, any time of the year.

Antiquing Tip Of The Day

If you reach your hand underneath the front of a chair, often at the edge you can feel the raw wood. If it’s smooth, it is machine-cut, which means the chair was made after 1860. If it’s rough, it is hand-cut, and the piece is likely much older.

— Toma Clark Haines, founder of the Antiques Diva & Co.
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